Russophobia, Ukraine and the 2016 Election

YASHA LEVINE, mail at yashalevine.com, @yashalevine

Levine publishes the newly-launched Immigrants as a Weapon newsletter which explores the “weaponization of nationalism and immigrant communities.”

This morning, one of the witnesses at the House Judiciary committee impeachment hearing, Stanford Law School professor Pamela S. Karlan, said the U.S. government has to help Ukraine fight “the Russians so we don’t have to fight them here.”

Levine’s recent pieces include “Russophobia? What Russophobia?” in which he writes: “For years our liberal media’s been bombarding readers and viewers with racist stereotypes and tropes about ‘the Russians’ and the threat they pose to ‘our’ society.”

Levine also recently wrote the piece “Yes, Ukraine interfered in the 2016 presidential election,” which notes that many impeachment witnesses have repeated the claim that interference by “Ukrainian government officials did not happen in 2016 and that anyone who says otherwise is spreading toxic Russian propaganda.”

But Levine cites several mainstream pieces from 2016, including “Ukraine’s Leaders Campaign Against ‘Pro-Putin’ Trump” in the Financial Times. The piece reported on August 28, 2016: “The prospect of Mr. Trump, who has praised Ukraine’s arch-enemy Vladimir Putin, becoming leader of the country’s biggest ally has spurred not just [parliament member Serhiy] Leshchenko but Kiev’s wider political leadership to do something they would never have attempted before: intervene, however indirectly, in a U.S. election.”

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