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The Report of the Augar Review investigating the future of post-18 education funding has finally been published. The Review was motivated by two factors. On the one hand, this was Theresa May’s desperate response to Jeremy Corbyn’s commitment to scrap university tuition fees and to bring back the Education Maintenance Allowance that David Cameron and […]

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<!– –> Former Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.) is by far the richest Democratic presidential contender, with an estimated net worth ranging from $56 million to $280 million, according to personal financial disclosure data. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) Check out the net worth and financial disclosures of the 2020 Democrats. For a detailed analysis of President Donald […]

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Elizabeth Warren wants to cancel part or all student loan debt for 95 percent of Americans and make public college free for everyone—the latest, and perhaps most ambitious, policy proposal for the 2020 Democratic contender. Warren announced the policy in a Medium post Monday morning. The Massachusetts Democrat told readers that her own past as […]

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Many People are Too Broke for Bankruptcy. A New Report Suggests Some Fixes.

April 15, 2019           |                                       

It’s tax season. That also means it’s bankruptcy season. Every year, bankruptcy filings peak in March and stay elevated in April, as people use their precious tax refunds to finally purchase the thing they couldn’t afford before: bankruptcy. All sorts of bad things happen when bankruptcy is out of reach for people, as we showed […]

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This article is part of a series by openDemocracy and the Bretton Woods Project on the crisis of multilateralism. The views expressed are those of the author’s only, and are not necessarily representative of either organisation. The consequences of IMF and World bank policies have been traumatic for the people of South. They have increased […]

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Sen. Bernie Sanders on Saturday became the first 2020 presidential candidate to speak out in support of allowing Americans to vote from behind bars. During a campaign stop in Iowa, the Independent senator from Vermont was asked about his position on imprisoned people participating in political elections. “I think that is absolutely the direction we […]

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The IRS Tried to Take on the Ultrawealthy. It Didn’t Go Well.

April 6, 2019           |                                       

Union Locals Build Support for the Green New Deal’s “Just Transition” Settler Colonialism Lurked Beneath the Christchurch Massacre Trump Administration Revokes ICC Prosecutor’s Visa Over War Crimes Probe In the Wake of Cyclone Idai, the North Has a Climate Debt to Pay The IRS Tried to Take on the Ultrawealthy. It Didn’t Go Well. The […]

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Trapped in a Deadly Chase

April 4, 2019           |                                       

As many modern police agencies move away from high-speed chases, placing tight restrictions on when their officers can pursue suspects, the Border Patrol allows its agents wide latitude to use them to catch people trying to enter the country illegally, a practice that often ends in gruesome injuries and, sometimes, death, a ProPublica and Los […]

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It’s a pet theory of mine, probably wrong, but nonetheless fun to think about, that it’s Trump’s role as debtor that holds a key to his appeal. In June 2016, Donald Trump told CBS This Morning, “I’m the king of debt. I’m great with debt. Nobody knows debt better than me.” And it’s true: Trump […]

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Monetary Policy Takes Center Stage: MMT, QE, or Public Banks?

March 24, 2019           |                                       

As alarm bells sound over the advancing destruction of the environment, a variety of Green New Deal proposals have appeared in the US and Europe, along with some interesting academic debates about how to fund them. Monetary policy, normally relegated to obscure academic tomes and bureaucratic meetings behind closed doors, has suddenly taken center stage. […]

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QE Forever: The Fed’s Dramatic About-face

February 23, 2019           |                                       

“Quantitative easing” was supposed to be an emergency measure. The Federal Reserve “eased” shrinkage in the money supply due to the 2008-09 credit crisis by pumping out trillions of dollars in new bank reserves. After the crisis, the presumption was that the Fed would “normalize” conditions by sopping up the excess reserves through “quantitative tightening” […]

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“Quantitative easing” was supposed to be an emergency measure, but the Federal Reserve is now taking a surprising new approach toward the policy. The Fed “eased” shrinkage in the money supply due to the 2008-09 credit crisis by pumping out trillions of dollars in new bank reserves. After the crisis, the presumption was the Fed […]

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“Quantitative easing” was supposed to be an emergency measure, but the Federal Reserve is now taking a surprising new approach toward the policy. The Fed “eased” shrinkage in the money supply due to the 2008-09 credit crisis by pumping out trillions of dollars in new bank reserves. After the crisis, the presumption was the Fed […]

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Puerto Rico Debt Deal Receives Court Approval

February 5, 2019           |                                       

WASHINGTON – Judge Laura Taylor Swain approved a deal to restructure $17 billion of Puerto Rico’s $72 billion debt on Monday. Court approval was the last hurdle creditors and the island’s oversight board needed for a plan to address sales tax backed debt or “COFINA” debt. “We are worried that not enough debt is being […]

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The former chair and CEO of Starbucks, Howard Schultz, speaks during a presentation on his book “From the Ground Up” on Jan. 28, 2019 in New York City. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images Is this a joke? Billionaire Howard Schultz is considering running for president of the United States. The ex-Starbucks CEO and former owner of the […]

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